How To Grow Garlic In 3 Simple Steps

A little prep work—and planting at the right time—will yield loads of healthy, robust garlic cloves.

March 13, 2017
sprouted garlic before planting garlic
Copit/ Getty

While you can plant garlic in spring as soon as the ground can be worked, fall is actually the best time to plant plump garlic cloves in your garden. Doing so allows them to put out a generous tuft of roots over the winter, and ensures maximum garlic harvests next summer. But you can't just plop them in the ground—follow these steps for a healthy garlic crop:

(Whether you're starting your first garden or switching to organic, Rodale’s Basic Organic Gardening has all the answers and advice you need—get your copy today!)

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1. Soak The Cloves

soaking garlic
PHOTOGRAPH BY CHRISTA NEU

Break a garlic bulb apart into individual cloves, being careful to keep the papery skins covering each clove intact. Then fill a quart jar with water and mix in 1 tablespoon of baking soda and 1 tablespoon of liquid seaweed (available on Amazon.com or at your local garden store). Soak the garlic cloves in this mixture for 2 hours prior to planting to prevent fungal disease and encourage vigorous growth.

Related: The Best Way To Grow Garlic

2. Place In Furrows

planting garlic
PHOTOGRAPH BY YURIS/GETTY

In the meantime, prepare your bed for planting. Garlic grows best in rich, well-drained soil that is free of weeds. Dig a furrow about 3 inches deep. Place the presoaked garlic cloves into the furrow, spacing them 6 to 8 inches apart. Be sure the flat root end is down and the pointy end is up.

 
Related: Growing Garlic Greens Indoors

3. Cover

garlic shoots
PHOTOGRAPH BY GORGOTS/GETTY

Cover the garlic cloves with 2 inches of soil and side-dress the furrow with compost or scratch in granulated organic fertilizer. Water the bed in well and cover it with 6 to 8 inches of straw mulch. You should see shoots poking through the mulch in 4 to 6 weeks. The garlic stops growing in the winter months and resumes in spring.

For more details, watch our video:

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